Expojure Lets You Share Photos Everywhere With a Single Click

Taking photos is fun. Uploading photos to every network under the sun is the opposite of fun, never mind actually tagging anything, which is essential if you want anybody to see your work. There are a few shortcuts to this chore, such as cross-sharing directly from one service to another, but a new platform named Expojure looks like a truly catch-all solution.

http://youtu.be/75vCvP_KZz8

The beta-stage site acts as a kind of central online photo library, to which you then connect your Facebook, Flickr, 500px, SmugMug and Google+ accounts for easy sharing. Integrations with Instagram, Tumblr and WordPress (among others) are also in development, with January the proposed month for delivery.

In use, the platform is remarkably simple. Uploaded photos can be given a title, a description, a category and some tags, and can be sorted into collections (read albums). There’s also a Lightroom plugin on offer to expedite the process even further, and the eventual plan is to add mobile apps, too. The Organizer is a kind of Pinterest-style grid, with collections on the left, and the control panel on the right. Once all your profiles are hooked up, any photos or albums you select can be beamed off to each network with a single click.

The only things lacking from the service are more detailed options, such as geolocation; such features are all in the pipeline, but Expojure is currently crowdfunding the money to make it happen. In its current form, the service is very useful, but with some additions, it will become an essential tool for any web-savvy photographer.

Check out the service for yourself: http://expojure.com

Extra Time — SnapJet

Instant photography has been on the comeback trail recently. You may have heard about the tiny printers made by Fuji that are designed for putting smartphone photos on paper. A new entrant has just emerged, named SnapJet, and it is open source.

Like its competitors, SnapJet requires no ink, and has Wi-Fi for wireless printing. But the advantage of being open source is that you lose the “walled garden” approach of big companies, so you don’t need to download any apps in order to print with the SnapJet. You just connect and press print, as you would with any modern inkjet. The results are pretty amazing in terms of reproduction and resolution, I have to say.

While the SnapJet is not on sale just yet, it will be arriving on Kickstarter in the coming weeks.


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